Incredible Rice Terraces in Bali

An ideal vacation to Bali includes strolling along picture-perfect beaches, visiting temples, indulging in delectable cuisine, taking in colourful ceremonies, listening to the roar of waterfalls and taking in stunning scenery. Not many people know about the stunning & mesmerising view of rice paddies. No matter how many you’ve already seen, Bali’s dreamy rice terraces will win your heart.

We arrived at Jaltiuwih Rice terrace around noon and it was raining quite heavily. Though the view was great, the incessant rains were making it tough to step out of the car. We waited for around an hour at one of the lovely restaurants and had lunch in the meanwhile. The rain finally stopped and we were all excited and charged up. A small alley across the paddy fields was inviting us to explore this lovely view closely. We travelled the red route through the rice fields, passing a few farmers and cows that were taking a break in the nearby covered shacks. We eventually arrived at a paved road from which we could capture stunning images of the majestic rice terraces and the distant, dramatic views of Mount Batukaru.

Jatiluwih Rice Terrace

A staple cuisine in Bali, rice is closely associated with Balinese culture. The rice growth cycle very much establishes the framework for traditional Balinese living. The Balinese people consider rice to be a gift from God and a representation of life. The three types of rice grown on Bali’s stunning rice terraces—white rice, black rice, and red rice—have been produced by the Balinese people for countless generations. White rice is the most widely available, whereas red rice is considerably more expensive and unusual. My freind bought samples of each type of rice from the local farmer.

Asia is home to many beautiful rice fields, but what sets the Balinese rice terraces apart is the Subak irrigation system, which was even added to the UNESCO list of world historic monuments. The Tri Hita Karana philosophy, which is a part of Balinese culture, is manifested in the Subak system. 

This way of thinking permeates practically every element of daily life in Bali, including Balinese architecture, daily rituals and offerings, and the subak water system. Agriculture crops thrive in Bali’s fertile soil, which is the perfect combination with the island’s humid tropical environment. The subak method, which integrates spiritual, natural, and social aspects, is used to water all of these crops.

Although the Jatiluwih rice terraces are not yet as popular with tourists as Tegalalang is (the eateries and the marked trails indicate they will soon become one of the most popular rice fields in Bali), early access is usually advised. However, you shouldn’t worry too much because, because of their size, you can probably still find some peace and quiet even in the middle of the day.

We still have a few Bali rice fields on our bucket list for our subsequent trip because there are so many beautiful ones that it is difficult to see them all. Particularly the one in West Bali.